March 2012 Archives

March 21, 2012

Maryland Defendants Protected by Supreme Court Plea Deal Decision

The United States Supreme Court today ruled that criminal defendants have the constitutional right to effective representation when making the decision as to whether or not to accept a plea bargain. In two paired cases, Lafler v. Cooper and Missouri v. Frye, the Court ruled that an attorney's mistakes at the plea bargain stage can render a defendant's plea ineffectual.

supreme court.jpg Our Annapolis criminal defense attorneys are experienced at giving our clients the right advice with regard to all of the client's available options, including plea deals. In today's legal climate, more often than not, criminal charges are resolved by way of plea bargains, rather than trials. Our attorneys are prepared to provide our clients with the proper guidance as to what will give the clients the best results possible.

In Cooper, Cooper's attorney informed him that he could not be convicted of assault with intent to murder, because of the attorney's belief that Michigan law did not permit a finding of intent to murder when the victim was shot below the waist; the attorney was wrong. As a result, Cooper rejected a plea deal, under which he would have received a recommended 51-to-85-month sentence. He was subsequently convicted at trial, and received the mandatory minimum 185-to-360-month sentence.

In Frye, the defendant was arrested for driving with a revoked license, the third time he had been arrested for that offense. Frye faced a maximum of four years in prison on the charge. The prosecutor in the case provided Frye's attorney with an offer to reduce the charge, making it a misdemeanor, with a 90 day jail sentence. Frye's attorney, however, did not bother to relay the offer to his client. Frye ultimately plead guilty to the charge, without the benefit of the offered plea bargain, and was sentenced to three years in prison.

Continue reading "Maryland Defendants Protected by Supreme Court Plea Deal Decision" »